BASERANGE MELBOURNE STORE PRESENTS:

W A I S T   0 2    B Y   
A N Y O N E G I R L . C O M

WAIST is a print project by Yasmine Ganley and Natasha Mead. The contributing artists’ pieces reflect on the female mid-section, as symbol and physicality, and collectively highlight the subtle communication of this body part.

Baserange Melbourne Store invites you to contemplate the photographic works featured in anyonegirl.com’s publication, WAIST, as part of a collaborative in-store exhibition.

We spoke with Yasmine and Natasha about the second issue of WAIST, and of their larger creative processes and experiences.

 
 

WHAT WAS YOUR INTENTION BEHIND CREATING THE SECOND ISSUE OF WAIST?

YASMINE: I started by wanting to capture movement in motion. The very first shoot we ever did for WAIST was with photographer Greta van der Star where we invited two friends to come into a space and move in reaction to what I was talking about – I was prompting them with ideas from the gut, for example; what does a buried emotion feel like in your body? 

This second issue was a continuation from this idea, however, this time I was also interested in creating movement on the page through language, layout design and working with the medium of film. A lot of printed images in magazines feel very 2D for me, so for this second issue I was really trying to explore ways in which we could disrupt that traditional set up.

NATASHA: In terms of the scope, Yasmine and I felt we’d only just started to dip our toes in with the first issue, so this one was about pushing the original WAIST ideas further, while exploring it via the concepts of film and motion. It’s twice the size of the first issue and that extra room was a real luxury in terms of giving ourselves and the contributors more depth.

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NATASHA, WHAT DO YOU INSTINCTIVELY SEEK OUT AS
A DESIGNER?

I look to a lot of historic design references, architecture annuals, old furniture manuals - publications that are utilitarian but beautiful. I like how unselfconscious they are in their design, and that they feel both modern and yet of no specific time period - something I hope to convey a of sense of in WAIST.

DO YOU HAVE A NOTABLE MEMORY OR EXPERIENCE FROM MAKING THIS WAIST JOURNAL?

Y: Driving through Joshua Tree desert with Natasha, Greta and Chelsea Jade listening to Chelsea’s new album before its release. The first time I heard her lyrics for Perfect Stranger I cried. I was so happy when she agreed to let me publish them in this issue.

N: Many, but perhaps Yasmine and I doing the language of flowers story. By the time we’d finished my kitchen was strewn with candles, matches, cans of sardines, and many, many flowers. It was like being inside a still life painting and I remember wanting to leave it exactly like that from then on (although that was somewhat impractical).

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WE LOVE SEEING HOW INTIMATE AND CONNECTED YOUR COMMUNITY IS IN NEW ZEALAND, AS WELL AS YOUR GLOBAL NETWORK OF COLLABORATORS AND FRIENDS.

WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE COMMON THREAD THAT TIES YOU ALL TOGETHER?

Y: We’re not competitive with each other, it feels very inclusive and supportive. A safe space to grow and nurture each other’s ideas. Perhaps, too, we all have a mutual love for print and making something slowly and with intention. It balances out our other work. I really wanted to make the journal for this community, as a way to celebrate our friendship. 

N: I think New Zealand’s small size helps - we’re all connected by our relative isolation, and there seems to be a shared love of making things together, perhaps especially when they offer a different outlet to our other works. The opportunity Yas created in the journal, bringing together so many women with the room to create for themselves, is genuinely a gift.

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SELF PORTRAIT BY KIMBRA AUDREY,
PAGE 7 OF WASIT 02

 
 

WHAT DO YOU LOOK FOR AS AN EDITOR AND CURATOR, YASMINE?

Work that honours the process. I love the process of making over a finished product, and am drawn to people who like to experiment or shape things in a new way. I love seeing things from the inside out and feel most compelled by those who are brave enough to share their work in honest and transparent ways. It must feel human, not perfect.

 
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WHICH PIECE OF WORK FROM THE ISSUE SURPRISED YOU, OR SHOWED YOU SOMETHING NEW?

Y: Su Wu’s poem made my heart stop. She has carved out a way to express the most exact way she is feeling. There’s never phrases you’ve heard before or any cliché imagery, it’s raw and powerful.

N: I really enjoyed both the written piece and stills by Veronica Crockford-Pound (Musing on the Film Image). It contained ideas I was vaguely aware of but didn’t know any of the film history behind - like Suspended Bodies. Her Super8 stills accompanying it are sublime and slightly haunting.


 

 P H O T O S   B Y   G R E T A   V A N    D E R    S T A R     F O R   S H E R I E   M U I J S   X   W A I S T    N O .   1 9   T - S H I R T

P H O T O S   B Y   G R E T A   V A N    D E R    S T A R    
F O R   S H E R I E   M U I J S   X   W A I S T   
N O .   1 9   T - S H I R T

 
 

WAIST 02 prints by selected artists and the
Sherie Muijs x WAIST t-shirts are available
at Baserange Melbourne Store.